Bill monroe and his blue grass boys bluegrass ramble


"Monroe Crossing has a long history of performing songs from styles of music other than bluegrass, and their latest project is sure to please both fans of bluegrass and classic country music. The band has created some clever and compelling arrangements of these wonderful songs from a great era in music, and the project features the outstanding pickin' and singin' we've come to expect from Monroe Crossing." -- Marty Scarbrough,  KASU Program Director

Credited with the deaths of 100 or more badmen, Hickok emerged as perhaps the most prolific man-killer of his generation. But when some of his critics branded him a ‘red-handed murderer,’ his reaction was predictable. Hickok admitted his flaws and vices as do most people, but he reckoned that being called a red-handed murderer was going too far. In February 1873, it was widely reported that he had been shot dead by Texans at Fort Dodge in Kansas. Worse, it was suggested that, like all men of his kind, he had died with his boots on. Wild Bill broke his silence of some years and wrote angrily to several newspapers, declaring, ‘No Texan has, nor ever will `corral William.” He also demanded to know who it was who prophesied that he and others should die with their boots on. ‘I have never insulted man or woman in my life, but if you knew what a wholesome regard I have for damn liars and rascals they would be liable to keep out of my way.’ Two years later, in conversation with Annie Tallant, one of the first white women to enter the Black Hills, Hickok again denied that he was a red-handed murderer, but admitted that he had killed men in self-defense or in the line of duty, adding, ‘I never allowed a man to get the drop on me.’


Bill Monroe And His Blue Grass Boys Bluegrass RambleBill Monroe And His Blue Grass Boys Bluegrass RambleBill Monroe And His Blue Grass Boys Bluegrass RambleBill Monroe And His Blue Grass Boys Bluegrass Ramble

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